Projector Review: PowerLite Home Cinema 1440 1080p 3LCD Projector

Written by Evan Powell, January 19, 2016 | ProjectorCentral.com

Angled Product ImageThe Epson Home Cinema 1440 is one of the new cinema projectors released by Epson that targets ambient light situations from Super Bowl parties to sports bars. If you want big screen display of live music concerts to liven up your cocktail parties, the HC1440 is a natural. This new model pumps out 4400 lumens of HD 1080p video, enough to light up 150″ to 200″ screens without having to turn the lights off. And it is a compact, 10 lb model that you can install yourself with no muss no fuss. Best yet, all of this lumen power will only set you back $1,699.

Picture Quality

The whole point of the HC1440 is getting the brightest HD picture possible for the money. The projector is rated at a maximum of 4400 lumens, and on our test sample the brightest preset, Dynamic, measures 4350 lumens, essentially on target. Meanwhile, the two Cinema modes which have a more neutral color balance measure about 2800 lumens. The Dynamic mode has a somewhat greenish bias, although not severe or objectionable. The big question is whether you’d want to give up 1/3 of your total light potential to get more accurate color?

The answer for most users will be “no way.” This is a Super Bowl party projector, intended for big screen use in ambient light. You are buying it because you want 4000+ lumens. Even at its default settings, the HC1440’s Dynamic mode delivers an engaging and exciting picture. Despite what a professional would describe as a greenish bias, nobody at a party would think the picture looks green, or notice any color biases in the image at all–for the most part colors look perfectly natural. A low-saturation light blue sky may appear bluish-green, but saturated colors all look solid and accurate.

However, there is an easy way to improve the picture quality without bothering with a professional calibration. In the onscreen menu, go to Image/Advanced/RGB and drop Offset G from 0 to -1. Believe it or not, this tiny adjustment takes out a noticeable amount of the green, improves color saturation and contrast, and renders better flesh tones. Meanwhile it reduces lumen output by only 3%, so you still end up netting out 4200+ lumens. This is the way I would run this projector at my own Super Bowl party.

As far as sharpness is concerned, the HC1440 has a Sharpness control that ranges from -5 to +5, and it is set to default to 0 in all color modes. This produces a picture that, to my taste, is not quite sharp enough. The interesting thing about the HC1440 is that the sharpening algorithms do not produce gross edge enhancements like they do on many other video displays. Instead it gives you an artful refinement of the image. You can boost sharpness to +2 or +3 to produce a noticeably sharper picture without imparting any sense of artificial processing that makes it look harsh or digital. You can experiment with it yourself to find your own preferred setting, but the traditional mantra of us videophiles who insist that Sharpness controls be turned off does not apply to this projector.

The same is true of the noise reduction filters. The projector’s color modes default to a setting of NR1 out of the three options Off, NR1 and NR2. Noise reduction filters reduce digital noise at the expense of some image detail, but in this case the trade-off is worth it. To my taste the NR1 is the overall optimized solution, as there is a bit too much noise in many sources with noise reduction set to Off.

The HD1440 has three color presets other than Dynamic. They are Bright Cinema, Cinema, and Game. Oddly enough, they all measure about the same 2800 lumens. The two Cinema modes have more accurate color than Dynamic as well as a slightly smoother, more refined image quality. But the difference is quite subtle. The primary difference between Bright Cinema and Cinema is the default gamma settings rather than total lumen output. These operating modes would be more appropriate for use in lower ambient light, and if I did not need Dynamic’s lumen power I would opt for the Cinema modes.

As far as Game mode is concerned, the fastest input lag we could measure on this projector is 56 ms. So it is not going to be the ideal choice for gaming enthusiasts who want the fastest response times possible (Epson’s HC 2040 measures 24 ms, so if your interests are primarily gaming you’d probably want to look at something like that.)

Overall, the HC 1440 is a party projector, ideal for big screen HD video and sports presentations in ambient light, whether in the home or a sports bar. And for this purpose it is outstanding.

Key Features

Excellent value. Superb combination of high resolution, high lumens and color brightness, for a great price.

Epson 1440 connection panel

Mobile/portable. At only 10 lbs, the 1440 is easily transportable. An onboard 16-watt speaker gives you some room-filling audio if you need it in portable applications.

Long zoom range. A 1.65 zoom ranges lets you fill a 120″ diagonal screen anywhere from 12 to 19 foot throw distance.

Stream HD shows. Supports MHL-enabled devices, Chromecast, Roku Streaming Stick and Amazon Fire TV Stick.

Split Screen Viewing. Watch two shows at once. Pictures are displayed either side by side in equal sizes, or one large and one small. A full image of both signals is always 100% visible (no picture in picture where one is overlaid on the other).

Low fan noise in eco-mode. Fan noise is surprisingly low in eco mode for a projector of this size and brightness.

Inexpensive replacement lamp. At just $149, new lamps are noticeably cheaper than competing lamps that often run $250 or more.

H+V keystone. +/- 30 degrees Vertical keystone, +/- 20 degrees horizontal

Security. Password protection is an option if you want to use it, and the projector comes with a Kensington lock.

Performance

Brightness. The Epson Home Cinema 1440 is rated at 4400 lumens of white light and 4400 lumens of color brightness. It has four factory preset operating modes and no separate user programmable modes, although all four factory presets can be modified by the user. With the lamp on full power and the zoom lens set to its widest angle position, our test unit produced ANSI lumens readings as follows:

Epson Home Cinema 1440 ANSI Lumens

MODE Normal Lamp Eco mode
Dynamic 4350 3175
Bright Cinema 2810 2051
Cinema 2800 2044
Game 2790 2037

Zoom lens effect.The HC 1440 has a 1.65x zoom lens that will curtail light output by up to 36% as you move from its brightest, most wide angle position, to its most telephoto (longest throw for a given image size). This light loss is not particularly unusual for a 1.6x zoom lens, but it means that if you need the full lumen power of the projector, you should plan to install it as close to the screen as you can in order to use the wide angle end of the lens.

Eco mode. The 1440’s eco mode reduces light output in all modes by 27%. It also curtails fan noise considerably and increases anticipated lamp life from 3000 to 4000 hours.

Brightness Uniformity. Uniformity measures a very good 84%, with light fading off just slightly to the upper right and left corners. But uniformity throughout the rest of the image is excellent.

Epson 1440 remote

Input lag. The Bodnar meter measures 73 ms input lag in Fine mode and 56 ms in Fast mode.

Fan noise. If you are in a quiet room, fan noise on the 1440 Audible noise is moderate and quite noticeable in full lamp mode — normal for a data projector that produces this amount of light, and certainly louder than a typical home theater projector. If you are using it for party entertainment to show music concert videos, or football parties, the fan noise will never be heard. If you are watching Bubba Watson about to tee off and the Quiet signs are up, you will become aware of the fan if the projector is anywhere near you. This is not surprising since the unit is rather small for the amount of light it produces so there is little opportunity to baffle fan noise internally.

In eco-mode, it’s a different ball game. Fan noise drops substantially to where it becomes remarkably quiet and perfectly acceptable for even a relatively small home theater room. On the other hand,High Altitude Mode is required at elevations above 1500 m, or about 5000 feet. In this mode the fan noise is increased loud enough that you’d want to take steps to baffle it behind a wall if it is used in a home theater room. But for party environments (the most likely usage) it is still not a problem.

Lamp life and price. Epson estimates lamp life at full power to be 3000 hours in Normal lamp mode and 4000 in eco-mode. Replacement lamps cost $149, which is noticeably less than most of the competition.

Set Up

The Epson Home Cinema 1440 will thrown a 120″ diagonal 16:9 image from a distance of between 11.7 and 19.3 feet, give or take a couple inches. It is easily bright enough to fill a much larger screen. At 180″ diagonal, you’ll need to set it back between 17.5 and 29 feet. Use the Projection Calculator to determine your actual throw distance options based your desired screen size.

Since the zoom lens curtails light output at the telephoto end by 36%, if you need the full lumen power of the projector you will want to place it relatively close to the screen in order to use the wide angle end of the zoom.

There is no lens shift. The HC1440 throws the image so that its ideal placement is on a shelf or stand behind and just above the heads of the audience. About 88% of the projected image is above the centerline of the lens and 12% is below the centerline. So it can be positioned on a shelf or stand without requiring much if any tilt.

If you wish to ceiling mount it, that’s no problem, but the projector will likely require an extension drop tube so that it is placed at a height that will accommodate its throw angle without a tilt. The manual does not stipulate any maximum tilt, but 15 degrees is about the maximum recommended for most projectors due to the fact that tilting the unit will interfere with its cooling system. A few projectors are built to withstand non-horizontal installations, but the 1440 is not one of them.

As you can see below, the 1440 has a form factor with relatively shallow depth, about 11.5 inches. So it can be placed on a bookshelf as long as there is sufficient clearance to the sides and above it for heat dissipation.

Important warning. Due to the unique throw angle of this projector, you might be tempted to invert it and set it on a high shelf. Never invert a projector and set it on its top in direct contact with a shelf — it is pretty much guaranteed to overheat in that situation.

Epson 1440 top view

Installation Trade-offs

Ideal throw distance. The big question is this — where is the ideal placement when you’ve got a 1.6x zoom and you can choose to ceiling mount it anywhere between 12 and 19 feet to hit a 120″ screen? The trade-offs are these:

1. If you place it at 12 feet, you get the maximum light output from the projector which is good if you need it. The downside is that in this position it throws the widest angle cone of projected light, and light striking the screen toward the sides of the image will tend to bounce off away from the center viewing position. So it is a bit less than ideal for even screen illumination.

2. If you place it at 19 feet, you get the minimum light from the projector, but if that is already enough it doesn’t matter. The advantage is that you narrow the cone of projected light, providing a more even illumination of the screen since light hitting the sides of the screen does not bounce off at as much of an oblique angle.

3. If you place it at 15-16 feet, you get equal trade-offs of the above. Also, in theory the midpoint of the zoom lens is its optical sweet spot, but a 1080p resolution image is not going to tax the optical resolution of the lens enough for you to notice.

Plan for lamp degradation. In planning your installation, keep in mind that a good rule of thumb is to anticipate that high pressure lamps will lose 25% of their brightness in the first 500 hours of operation, then degrade more slowly after that. With this in mind, many people choose their screen size and screen gain assuming they will use the projector’s eco-mode for the first 500-750 hours, then switch to full lamp mode for the remainder of the lamp’s life. By following this strategy you can even out the average light levels on the screen over the lamp’s entire life.

On the other hand, if you need the full 4000+ lumens, you can keep it up at that level by replacing the lamp more frequently than the estimated lamp life. This is particularly easy to do with the HC 1440 since replacement lamps are only $149.

Limitations

No 3D capability. If 3D is your thing, look elsewhere as the 1440 does not do it.

No lens shift. A bit of lens shift would have been helpful for easier installation. Since there is none, make sure to take extra care while planning the set up.

No frame interpolation or detail enhancement. These features are present on many Epson home cinema projectors, but they are not on the 1440.

Fan noise. In normal (full lamp) mode the fan noise is higher than desirable for home theater applications, although it is remarkably quiet in eco-mode. On the other hand, it is no issue if you are using it for Super Bowl parties, live concert videos, or in general for any sports event viewing.

16:10 Aspect Ratio. For cinema use you will probably be using a 16:9 screen. You can set up the 1440 to fill the screen with a 16:9 image, and the small black bars top and bottom will project onto the black frame and become invisible. If you have a need or desire to use a 16:10 format screen, a 16:9 image will be displayed with small black bars at the top and bottom of the screen image.

Air filter. The air filter needs periodic cleaning which is easy to do with a small computer keyboard vacuum cleaner swiped over the intake vent. How often you need to do this depends on how much dust there is in the room. If you forget to do it at all, the filter will eventually clog and the unit will overheat and automatically shut down.

Competition

We’ve given the Epson HC 1440 five stars for value. You may wonder at this given that there are a number of HD 1080p DLP projectors rated at 4000 or more lumens that sell for prices much lower than $1700.

The issue is that in this brightness range, most DLP projectors continue to rely on a large white segment in the color wheel to boost the ANSI lumen rating. This does indeed boost white light output, but it leaves colors relatively flat. As an example, we are currently reviewing the new Dell 4350, a 1080p DLP projector rated at 4000 lumens and selling for several hundred dollars less. And indeed, when we do the standard ANSI lumen test our sample measures 3907 lumens, or very close to its rating. However, when we measure the red, green, and blue components individually, they add up to 694 lumens. By comparison, the Epson 1440 still measures 4200+ lumens when the color components are measured individually. The result is that when you put these two units side by side, the color on the Epson 1440 is much more vibrant and saturated than it is on the Dell 4350.

This is not to say that all DLP projectors behave this way. DLP projectors built for home theater quite often have RGBRGB color wheels that deliver as much color light as they do white light. And in a number of recent DLP projectors that do have white segments in the wheel, we’ve seen a trend toward a reduction of the size of the white segment. This leads to much higher color brightness measurements than we’ve seen on DLP projectors in the past. On models with a reduce white segment there can be excellent color saturation and a very well balanced video image despite the presence of the white segment in the color wheel.

Nevertheless, when we look at inexpensive DLP projectors that are rated at 4000 lumens and above, it is still generally true that most of that lumen power is coming from a white segment, and that color brightness falls far short of the white potential. So if you are in the market for a bright video projector and are looking for 4000+ lumen models, keep these performance differences in mind. The lumen ratings can be quite misleading.

Conclusion

For what it is, the Epson HC 1440 is an outstanding projector at a superb value. It gives you full HD resolution and 4000+ lumens of reasonably well balanced color brightness for a relatively moderate price — perfect for home entertainment with some ambient light in the room, or any venue where you need bright video in some level of ambient light. The HC 1440 does not have the extra processing and performance features found on other Epson cinema projectors like frame interpolation, detail enhancement, and 3D capability. But for straightforward, bright, HD video in ambient light situations, the 1440 is tough to beat.


Ready to purchase? Click here to see the Epson PowerLite Home Cinema 1440 1080p 3LCD Projector on Projector SuperStore!


Written by Evan Powell, January 19, 2016 | Originally seen on ProjectorCentral.com. View original posting here.

ViewSonic Launches Latest 1080p Entertainment Projectors at #CES2016

ViewSonic Launches Latest 1080p Entertainment
Projectors at #CES2016

By Jasmine Geider | January 5, 2016

LAS VEGAS (Jan. 5, 2016) – ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of visual solution products, introduces the newest members of its LightStream™ family with the Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL entertainment projectors at #CES2016. The Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL projectors offer incredible color accuracy for stunning image quality, and enhanced sound technology for an immersive multimedia experience.

The ViewSonic® Pro7827HD is the first in the LightStream line to feature a RGBRGB 6-segment color wheel, powered by ViewSonic’s SuperColor™ technology providing detailed pictures and brilliant color gradient coverage. Along with ISF™ certification for color optimization and five viewing modes, 2200 lumens, and vertical lens shift, the Pro7827HD can create a cinematic experience in any home.

“The Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL deliver the perfect big picture for home entertainment,” said Aaron Campbell, product marketing manager at ViewSonic Americas. “With advanced color and audio technologies and PortAll™ to wirelessly stream content or play games on a giant projected screen, these two projectors ensure an immersive visual experience.”

With Full HD 1080p resolution, both the Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL projectors deliver a wider color range for true-to-life picture quality. Combined with a built-in 10W speaker that incorporates ViewSonic’s proprietary SonicExpert™ sound enhancement technology, the Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL are high-performance projectors ideal for big screen home entertainment. Both projectors come with PortAll™, a uniquely designed enclosure that houses an HDMI/MHL connection and supports wireless HDMI media streaming devices. The PortAll feature on these projectors also includes an integrated micro USB cable that allows users to quickly and easily power micro USB-enabled devices. The smart design of the Pro7827HD and PJD7828HDL includes a cable management hood that eliminates cable clutter.

Pro7827HD

The ViewSonic Pro7827HD is a 1080p native projector with 2200 lumens of brightness and a 22,000:1 contrast ratio. It comes with one standard HDMI and two HDMI/MHL inputs, along with RGB, Composite, Component, Audio, micro USB, RS232 and RJ45 connectors. With a 1.1-1.5 throw ratio, vertical lens shift and 1.3x optical zoom, the Pro7827HD provides extreme flexibility for easy set-up and installation.

PJD7828HDL

With 1080p native resolution, SuperColor technology and 3200 lumens of brightness which ensure bold and vivid colors for any projected image, the PJD7828HDL delivers the perfect balance of color quality and brightness. The projector features multiple connectivity options, including HDMI, HDMI/MHL. Its sleek design includes PortAll and a cable management hood that allows users to wireless stream via HDMI/ MHL connectors. Ideal for entry-level home entertainment enthusiasts, the PJD7828HDL features a smooth white finish that can blend into any home.

Pricing and Availability:

  • The Pro7827HD will be available for an MSRP of $1,299.00 (USD) and starts shipping in February
  • The PJD7828HDL will be available at a MAP price of $599.00 (USD) and starts shipping in January

For more information about ViewSonic’s LightStream series of projectors, visithttp://www.viewsonic.com/us/projectors/lightstream.html.

For further news and information about ViewSonic, visit ViewSonic.com and follow on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

About ViewSonic

Founded in California in 1987, ViewSonic is a world leading visual solutions provider. As an innovator and visionary, ViewSonic keeps the world connected with a portfolio of professional level visual solutions that enhance the way we compute, collaborate, communicate and connect. Our products include LED monitors, interactive commercial displays, touch displays, projectors, thin client, zero client and smart displays. To find out more about ViewSonic, visit viewsonic.com.

Ready to buy? See the PJD7828HDL at Projector SuperStore by clicking here!

Optoma’s Latest 1080p Home Projector Range

Movie fans, TV buffs and keen gamers can now enjoy a super-size cinema quality picture in any room in their home. Packed with features, Optoma’s range of 1080p home projectors deliver vivid clarity with pure, deep colors and high contrast thanks to deeper blacks and crisp whites. This means live sport, action-packed games, TV and movies can be enjoyed in stunning Full HD resolution any time of day.

See Optoma’s full line of projectors on the Projector SuperStore website here.

About Projector SuperStore – For over 20 years, Projector SuperStore has been the premier source for affordable Audio and Visual equipment online. We have worked with hundreds of businesses across the nation and have the expertise to help you integrate the right technology for your specific needs and bring your message to the masses. Whether you’re looking for a projector for a meeting room, a portable system for use in multi-purpose rooms, a state-of-the-art projection system for your main auditorium, the latest home theater technology or anything in between, we can help you create a system that is right for your needs and fits within your budget. View more information on our website here.

Optoma GT760 Projector Review – Big Screen Gaming on a Budget

Review Written By: Allan Abbott | View original article on Projector Central here.

The Optoma GT760 is a portable home entertainment gaming projector with the convenience of a short throw lens. You can set it up anywhere on a coffee table less than 4.5 feet from the wall and get a big bright 120″ diagonal picture. If you want a smaller picture, just move the unit closer to the wall. At 2.2 feet it gives you a brilliant 60″ image. And its 33 ms input lag is about as fast as it gets, so video gamers will get the best results their talents will allow. If you need fast action and the convenience of portable short throw set-up, the GT760 delivers for about $650.

If you are thinking of a more permanent installation, you can always ceiling mount the GT760. This is a native 720p projector, so it will compress a Blu-ray 1080p signal, but it will display all 720p signals in native format.

The Viewing Experience

The GT760 can produce a very nice picture for $650, but its best picture is not achieved out of the box with the factory preset operating modes. Without some tweaking, colors are low in saturation and contrast is a bit flat. Usually full color images show their best on a projector’s Movie or Cinema mode, while Presentation mode is best used for higher brightness data display. In this case, we found the best overall full color image was obtained by selecting Presentation mode and reducing the Brilliant Color setting from 10 down to 1. With this simple adjustment, we got a very pleasing full color image in both gaming and film sources. Colors and contrast were natural and engaging, skin tones were reasonably accurate and certainly natural looking, and there was sufficient shadow detail to avoid any sense of muddiness in the picture.

Gaming operation was responsive, and the images were well saturated. The GT760’s brightness overcame ambient light even in sunlit rooms, so if you are one of the many gamers that likes to play with some light in the room, the GT760 has it. For bright rooms, keeping the image diagonal under 60″ is recommended, but darkened rooms you can easily go to 120″ diagonal which can really add to the gaming experience.

Set-up Considerations

The GT760, like most short-throw projectors, has a fixed focal length with no zoom capability. You can produce a 60″ image from 2.2 feet, and a 120″ image from 4.4 feet. Which image you choose will depend on personal preference and ambient light. If you watch in the dark, you can go big. If the room is brightly lit, you will want to reduce image size to improve contrast and color saturation.

Vertical keystone correction may be adjusted over a ±40° range, but there is no horizontal keystone correction so you have to make sure the projector is facing the screen squarely.

As with all short-throw projectors, screen flatness can have a noticeable impact on the quality of the image (horizontal and/or vertical waviness) because of the acute projection angle. This may be a problem if you are using a portable tripod screen which doesn’t have the rigidity of a framed screen. Focusing is smooth and positive, and the remote control is full-size with clearly marked buttons.

Fan noise is remarkably low for a projector that puts out this much light. Heat being generated by its 190W lamp is exhausted from the GT760 through grates on the right side and front of the projector. This arrangement keeps what fan noise and heat flow there is away from the audience since they will be seated behind this short-throw projector.

Key Features

Lamp Life: The GT760 has an unusually long lamp life specification. Optoma says you can expect 4,500 hours in normal mode, but Eco mode increases lamp life to 6,500 hours with a corresponding reduction in fan noise. This ranks the GT760 at the top of its class for lamp life, and it means a lower cost of ownership. A replacement lamp (Optoma P/N BL-FU190D) is available for $179.

Picture Modes: The GT760 has five Picture Modes: Presentation, Bright, Movie, sRGB, and Blackboard. Each has its own color bias, gamma curve, and color temperature chosen to fit the specific presentation content. There is also one User mode for storing your favorite brightness, contrast, color temperature, and gamma settings (see the earlier caution on User settings).

Audio: While the GT670’s 2-watt speaker may not do the trick in a large room, for gaming in a small room it is more than adequate. Even at full volume, there is no rattle or buzz, and dialog and music are faithfully reproduced.

3D Capability: Like many of its DLP-chip contemporaries, the GT760 is full HD 3D ready. Separately priced shutter glasses are required (Optoma P/N BG-ZD301 @ $59 ea.), and 3D operation is initiated in the Display menu. Three 3D formats are accommodated: side-by-side, top and bottom, and frame sequential.

Remote Control and Menus: The remote control is laid out with menu directional keys at the top and special function keys at the bottom including a conveniently color-coded Eco mode key. The GT760 can detect sources automatically, but if you wish to select a particular input, there are direct selection keys for HDMI, VGA, and video sources. Menus have several layers, but they are easy to identify and select.

Image Settings: The GT760 provides a comprehensive Advanced sub-menu of the Image menu where individual color hue, gain, and saturation can be adjusted. It takes a while to adjust all seven color segments, but a little experimentation will provide you with all the flexibility you need to fine-tune the image.

Connectivity: Most standard sources can be accommodated by the GT760. HDMI, audio in and out, and composite/component/S-video all have individual connections, and there is a monitor loop-through connection. Dual VGA connectors simultaneously serve either two computer connections or one computer and a component video source. An RS-232 connection allows for connection to remote monitoring and control equipment.

Maintenance: Like most DLP projectors, there are no air filters to be replaced, but it is recommended that the intake and exhaust ports be vacuumed occasionally to remove dust or lint that might collect near the DLP chip. Lamps are replaced through the top of the GT760, so even ceiling mounted units are easy to service.

Warranty: Optoma offers a one-year warranty on the GT760, and its lamp is warranted for 90 days.

Performance

Brightness and Uniformity: Our test model of the GT760 exceeded its brightness specification by 10% with 3,750 ANSI lumens in Bright mode. Presentation delivered 2,540 lumens while Movie and sRGB modes put up 1,745 and 1,090 lumens, respectively. Brightness uniformity was 70% with the upper right portion of the image slightly brighter but with no discernible hot spots. Eco mode reduced brightness by about 20% in all modes. Unless maximum brightness is a requirement, Eco mode provides a bright image with reduced fan noise.

Image Size and Displacement: The GT760 can put up a 150″ diagonal image when placed just 5’5″ from the screen. At that image size, the bottom of the image is offset about 10″ above the centerline of the lens, and this is a good displacement for tabletop mounting. Since the GT760 has no zoom capability, a different image size will require moving the projector.

Frame delay: Gaming projectors should have no more than a two-frame delay, and the GT760 meets that requirement. Frame delay was 33 msec which is excellent for projectors of this class. That makes for good gaming performance.

Limitations

Resolution: This is an odd thing to list as a limitation. This projector’s 1280×720 resolution is a perfectly respectable resolution for the 3400 lumen brightness and short throw feature. However, if you want to spend another $100, if short throw is not a critical concern, you can get the Optoma HD131Xe or HD131xw instead. These are full 1920×1080 resolution projectors which will show 1080p sources like Blu-ray in native format. You lose the short throw feature so you need to move them back from the screen to get the same image size. Also they don’t have quite the same light output, but practically speaking they are not that much different after calibrations for optimum video quality. If short throw is not a big deal for you, you end up with a more refined and detail picture for not much more money.

Menu Layering – The GT760 offers many setting options, so its four on-screen menus are heavily layered to keep the menus from looking cluttered. Initial setup requires lots of button pushing, but once you have the image adjusted, menu layering ceases to be a problem.

User Setting: There is an undesirable interaction between the custom User calibration and any of the preset Picture modes. If you are in any preset mode such as Presentation and you adjust any settings, it will default to User mode and wipe out previous settings. We would prefer to see the ability to tweak Presentation mode without defaulting to User mode, and have a separate Reset command that returns Presentation to factory default settings if desired.

Conclusion

If gaming is your thing, the GT760 is an excellent short throw choice if your viewing room real estate is limited and you want a large, bright image. Video images also look good after some tweaks to brightness, contrast, and color saturation levels. Lamp life is long at 6,500 hours in Eco mode, so cost of ownership is lower than most projectors in its class. This is a personal entertainment projector, not one for the conference room, and if that is what you are looking for, the GT760 delivers.

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Ready to begin shopping for your projector? You can view the GT760 on our site here. You can also browse a variety of other projectors available from Projector SuperStore here. Don’t see the one you’re looking for, or have other questions? Give us a call at 888-525-6696 and one of our sales team members will be happy to assist you! 

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About Optoma- Optoma Technology, the number one supplier of DLP® projectors in the Americas, delivers projectors and related accessories to consumers, businesses and educators, as well as professional installers. Optoma’s product portfolio features digital projectors for mobile or fixed installations, as well as home theaters. With advanced optical engineering and dedication to quality, Optoma’s innovative products incorporate the latest refinements in video display technology. Optoma’s products meet the needs of business users and general consumers by combining superior image processing technologies with exceptional engineering in order to deliver images that are bright, crystal clear and finely-tuned for tone and color. You can learn more about Optoma on their website here.

About Projector SuperStore – For over 20 years, Projector SuperStore has been the premier source for affordable Audio and Visual equipment online. We have worked with hundreds of businesses across the nation and have the expertise to help you integrate the right technology for your specific needs and bring your message to the masses. Whether you’re looking for a projector for a meeting room, a portable system for use in multi-purpose rooms, a state-of-the-art projection system for your main auditorium, the latest home theater technology or anything in between, we can help you create a system that is right for your needs and fits within your budget. View more information on our website here.

What Makes DNP Screens Different?

When it comes to selecting the screen for your audio/visual installation, choosing the right one is essential. A bad screen can ruin the visual experience; a good one can dramatically improve it. DNP is the world’s leading supplier of optical projection screens for high quality display solutions. The DNP optical screen portfolio includes an extensive range of optical projection screens for both front and rear projection screen applications for all environments including home cinema / home theater, meeting rooms / conference rooms, control rooms, signage & advertising and more.

In the video above, you can see how significantly DNP’s technology increases the visibility of the image without having to turn off the lights or move to a brighter projector. You can read more about the design and technology on DNP’s site here.

Projector SuperStore is an authorized dealer for DNP screens. You can view their products on the PSS site here. For more information on how to increase the effectiveness of your presentations with a DNP screen, contact one of our sales team members today!